Susie Neilson

The FDA has approved a new drug that promises a simpler and far more effective treatment for drug-resistant tuberculosis. But not everyone is celebrating.

Doctors Without Borders has concerns about a critical bottom-line issue: How much will the drug cost in poor and middle-income countries, where most TB patients reside?

The stakes are so high because the difference between the new regimen — involving a drug called pretomanid — and the current drug regimen is so dramatic.

Updated at 3:37 p.m. ET

After a mass shooting at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, that left 22 people dead, the company said it would remove from its stores all signs, displays or videos that depict violence in an internal memo.

What if you could put a drop of water into a miniature laboratory — not much bigger than a smartphone — and find out whether the water contains the bacterium that causes cholera?

A simple test like that could help prevent outbreaks of the disease, which sickens as many as 4 million and kills up to 143,000 each year, mostly in poorer countries.

The ancient disease of cholera is spread primarily through drinking water that contains the bacterium called Vibrio cholerae.

When we smear on sunscreen, dermatologist Kanade Shinkai with the University of California, San Francisco says, most of us don't think about it getting under our skin.

"I think there was an assumption that these are things that we apply to our skin — they don't really get into our bloodstream," Shinkai says.

As an ingredient, sesame is pretty popular— it's in tahini and sushi; it's often mixed in granola, sprinkled on bagels or used as a flavoring in an array of dishes. But according to new research, this may be a problem for a substantial number of Americans.

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