Scott Detrow

ROME — The Biden administration has announced the broad outlines of a deal to end an expensive economic impasse that had led to growing tension between the United States and the European Union.

The United States will keep steel and aluminum tariffs on European nations, but will allow a certain amount of steel and aluminum produced in the EU to enter U.S. markets tariff-free.

Biden administration officials who briefed reporters on the breakthrough Saturday did not provide specifics on how much material would be allowed under the agreement.

ROME — President Biden and three European leaders sent a clear signal to Iran on Saturday that they are ready to return to the scuttled deal that eased sanctions against the country, in return for Iran limiting its nuclear program and opening it up to inspections.

Ahead of President Biden's visit with Pope Francis on Friday, a question was posed in a White House briefing about whether the meeting will be "personal or formal," and the answer from national security adviser Jake Sullivan was, "Both."

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SCOTT DETROW, HOST:

As moderate and progressive Democrats negotiate where to cut down a broad $3.5 trillion bill containing most of President Biden's domestic priorities, he is talking more and more about incremental progress.

Editor's note: This story is adapted from the podcast Sacred Ground by WITF's Tim Lambert and NPR's Scott Detrow. It contains explicit language.

Richard Guadagno's memory is scattered through his sister Lori's house two decades after his death.

President Biden said on Friday that his administration is focused on getting Americans out of Afghanistan by Aug. 31 but that he was also committed to trying to evacuate as many Afghan interpreters and others who assisted the U.S. government — a goal that he said was "equally important, almost" to evacuating Americans.

Updated July 28, 2021 at 6:00 PM ET

President Biden proposed a rule on Wednesday that would change the way the federal government assesses products made in America.

Updated May 28, 2021 at 12:50 PM ET

The same Russian hackers who carried out the SolarWinds attack and other malicious campaigns have now attacked groups involved in international development, human rights and other issues, according to Microsoft. The company said the breach began with a takeover of an email marketing account used by the U.S. Agency for International Development.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Sometimes the simplest thing to compromise is a debate over numbers. You tell your kid to go to bed in 10 minutes. She asks for 20. You settle on 15. It ends up being 45, but never mind about that.

Updated May 21, 2021 at 5:05 PM ET

In what appears to be a mostly symbolic step toward finding common ground with Senate Republicans, the Biden administration has lowered its spending proposal on its infrastructure and jobs proposal, from more than $2 trillion to $1.7 trillion.

Updated May 20, 2021 at 6:44 PM ET

Speaking at the White House an hour before an Egyptian-brokered cease-fire was set to go into effect in Israel and Gaza, President Biden expressed gratitude for the deal — which, if successful, would put at least a temporary halt to rocket attacks, airstrikes and other violence that has killed more than 200 Palestinians, as well as at least a dozen Israelis.

Updated May 16, 2021 at 8:44 PM ET

As Hamas rockets have rained down on Israeli cities, Israeli airstrikes and artillery have crumbled buildings in the Gaza Strip, and violent mobs have attacked one another in Israel's streets, President Biden has remained mostly muted about the escalating crisis.

With a 50-50 Senate and a paper-thin Democratic majority in the House, Louisa Terrell would have a tough job no matter what.

But the ongoing coronavirus pandemic has created a lot of unique challenges for the director of the White House Office of Legislative Affairs.

"You're not able to do the pull-asides you can do in an Easter egg roll [event], when people are there with their families — a great way to connect," Terrell told NPR. "Members are not roaming the halls all the time."

With college classes going online because of COVID-19, Joe Spofforth put his double major in political economies and educational studies on hold to move West and find work. When the pandemic was over, he'd go back.

"You can get real into this stuff," the 21-year-old Ohioan said, grinning at his mountain surroundings as his fellow Montana Conservation Corps crew members saw, chop and lop branches and logs away from a dirt path — trail work.

Standing, unshowered, in the shade of a tall stand of lodgepole pine in northwest Montana, he said it's a bit scary though.

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