Bobby Allyn

The Federal Trade Commission's antitrust lawsuit against Facebook can proceed, a federal judge ruled on Tuesday, delivering a major win for the agency after its first attempt at targeting the company's alleged monopoly power was dismissed for lack of evidence.

The sister of a federal security officer who was fatally shot while guarding a courthouse during George Floyd-related protests has sued Facebook, accusing the tech giant of playing a role in radicalizing the alleged shooter.

When Elizabeth Holmes jury deliberations entered its second week, Tyler Shultz got the jitters.

"I decided to deal with it by playing my guitar superloud. I probably disturbed my neighbors," said Shultz, an ex-Theranos employee who helped expose the once-hyped blood-testing startup. "I had a lot of nervous energy."

For Shultz, the moment had been building for some time. He blew the whistle on Theranos when he was just 22 years old. Now 31, he was ready for closure.

Jurors in the criminal fraud trial of Elizabeth Holmes sent a note to the judge on Monday morning saying they could not reach a unanimous decision on three of 11 fraud charges against the former Silicon Valley executive.

The note, however, seemed to suggest that they all agree on at least eight counts. If that's the case, it puts to rest speculation that they couldn't reach a verdict at all, which would have led to a mistrial.

The image of Elizabeth Holmes as a disgraced former startup founder who careened her once-high-flying blood-testing company off a cliff has been etched into Silicon Valley history.

Eight men and four women have sat in a federal courthouse in San Jose. Calif. for nearly four months. They have taken in testimony from a parade of witnesses in the criminal fraud case against former Silicon Valley superstar Elizabeth Holmes.

On Monday, the jury will start sharing their opinions with each other for the first time and begin debating whether Holmes is a callous scam artist or a tech visionary who got in over her head.

Holmes' legacy and freedom hang in the balance.

Elizabeth Holmes put on her mask and gazed out at the jury. She stepped down from the plexiglass-paneled witness stand, clasped her hands in front of her and slowly walked back to rejoin her lawyers at their table in the courtroom.

Wednesday concluded seven days of testimony for Holmes, as the defense announced it had rested its case. The fraud trial is now on the cusp of jury deliberations.

The Federal Trade Commission on Thursday sued to block a $40 billion deal in which the Silicon Valley chip maker Nvidia sought to buy British chip designer Arm.

Officials with the FTC say the deal, which would be the largest semiconductor-chip merger in history, would give Nvidia unlawful power, hurt competition and raise prices for consumers.

Three former Google employees have sued the company, alleging that Google's motto "Don't be evil" amounts to a contractual obligation that the tech giant has violated.

At the time the company hired the three software engineers, Rebecca Rivers, Sophie Waldman and Paul Duke, they signed conduct rules that included a "Don't be evil" provision, according to the suit.

Elizabeth Holmes told the jury in her criminal fraud trial on Tuesday that she personally put the letterhead of pharma giants Pfizer and Schering-Plough on documents sent to potential business partners and investors without the companies' consent.

It was the most damning admission Holmes has made under oath in three days of testifying in her own defense. The former CEO of the blood-testing company Theranos is attempting to persuade the jury that she is innocent of 11 counts of fraud and conspiracy to commit fraud.

There's a buzzword that tech, crypto and venture-capital types have become infatuated with lately. Conversations are now peppered with it, and you're not serious about the future until you add it to your Twitter bio: Web3.

It's an umbrella term for disparate ideas all pointing in the direction of eliminating the big middlemen on the internet. In this new era, navigating the web no longer means logging onto the likes of Facebook, Google or Twitter.

Gustavo Ajche is about to begin his shift in Lower Manhattan. He makes sure his e-bike is powered up and his iPhone mounted to his handlebars, then nods approvingly.

"Now we're gonna connect it to the app," he said. "I'm gonna start working."

Lawmakers in the Senate hammered representatives from Snapchat, TikTok and YouTube on Tuesday, in a combative hearing about whether the tech giants do enough to keep children safe online.

It marked the first time Snapchat and TikTok have landed in the hot seat in Washington, D.C., and for nearly four hours lawmakers pressed the officials about how the apps have been misused to promote bullying, worsen eating disorders and help teens buy dangerous drugs or engage in reckless behavior.

Former Apple program manager Janneke Parrish received some unwelcome news last month from her manager on the messaging app Slack.

"I was told that I was under investigation," she said.

Someone had leaked to the press details of a company meeting with Apple CEO Tim Cook and an internal memo warning against leaking. Parrish denies any involvement, but Apple had its suspicions. It confiscated her phone and other devices, she said.

Shortly after, Apple reached a decision.

Updated October 21, 2021 at 11:34 AM ET

Facebook's Oversight Board said in a report on Thursday that the social network "has not been fully forthcoming" about how it lets millions of prominent users escape the content moderation rules it applies to everyone else, a practice known inside the company as "cross-check."

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