Program Showcase

Special Report On Homelessness Consultant

Dec 1, 2018

May 18, 2018 — Today, we’re kicking of a special series on homelessness in Mendocino County with a look at Dr. Robert Marbut, a consultant whose recommendations about addressing homelessness were recently accepted by the Mendocino County Board of Supervisors and the Ukiah City Council.

A Place To Call Home: Chris and Cheri

Nov 30, 2018

May 31-- This is the first in a weekly series of interviews with people about their experiences being homeless in Mendocino County. We'll air it every Thursday afternoon at 1:30pm.

The two people we'll hear in the first episode talk about how they found themselves living on the street, the greatest dangers of homelessness, and their day-to-day lives.

I am grateful to everyone who has shared their stories and their time with me. 

A Place To Call Home: James Hoffman

Nov 29, 2018

June 12, 2018 -- Today we'll hear from James David Hoffman about his experiences being homeless in Ukiah. Hoffman, or Jimbo, as some people call him, is from the Redwood Valley Rancheria, is profoundly hearing impaired, and has struggled with addiction since puberty. He told me his story on May 11, shortly after he got out of jail. He spoke about a searing trauma in his youth, the beauty of sign language, and how he believes the spirit of his lost daughter has guided him away from death. It was a privilege to be the recipient of his story.

A Place To Call Home: Donald Damp

Nov 27, 2018

June 16, 2018 -- In this episode of A Place to Call Home, we'll hear from Donald Damp, an ambassador to the homeless community. He is formerly homeless himself, and now volunteers at organizations all over Ukiah, working to help currently homeless people get medical attention, basic necessities, and sometimes just a friendly or informative word. 

Tune in to hear him tell his story and discuss his philosophy about where life has led him.

Skunk Train

Is the Fort Bragg mill pond stalemate finally about to break? The city's spectacular waterfront has been all but off limits for a century, long dominated by a major lumber mill but in recent decades mired in dispute over an industrial waste cleanup and how to develop the site. Now, the owners of Fort Bragg's famous Skunk Train are in contract to buy  and develop 70 acres of the 419-acre site.

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