Merrit Kennedy

Seven percent of Catholic priests in Australia between 1950 and 2010 allegedly sexually abused children, according to data provided by church authorities in a major investigation.

Australia is the latest country to unearth widespread, decades-long child abuse by Catholic Church authorities.

The findings were released by The Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, which launched in 2013 to look at child abuse in places like schools and government organizations.

If you were outside in the Midwest at around 1:30 local time this morning, you might have received quite a shock.

A meteor streaked across the sky in a vivid, bright green flash. It set off sonic booms that were loud enough to shake houses in east-central Wisconsin, as National Weather Service meteorologist Jeff Last tells The Two-Way.

The United Nations is warning that Somalia could soon be facing a famine without urgent international action, raising concerns about a repeat of 2011's famine which killed more than a quarter of a million people.

Researchers in Hawaii have captured dramatic footage of a "firehose" of red-hot lava plummeting down a cliff into the Pacific Ocean, sending fragments of lava and clouds of gray smoke into the sky.

It's coming from the big island's Kilauea volcano, which has been erupting since January 1983.

Yes, you read that right – this month, cats will make an appearance at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show.

It's a break from 141 years of tradition. The cats will be part of a showcase designed to educate the public about different types of cats and dogs, called Meet & Compete.

The American Kennel Club describes the event as an "opportunity to meet and play with hundreds of adorable dogs and fabulous felines while learning about responsible pet ownership."

Hours after Israel approved 3,000 new settlement homes in the West Bank, Israeli security forces moved to evacuate settlers from an illegal outpost there, sparking scuffles.

Updated at 4:15 p.m. ET

Homeland Security officials are defending the Trump administration's executive order on immigration and refugees, along with its implementation.

At a news conference Tuesday, DHS Secretary John Kelly said the order creates a "temporary pause" as officials "assess the strengths and the weaknesses of our current system." He was adamant in saying that the order "is not — I repeat — not a ban on Muslims."

Media mogul Oprah Winfrey has a new gig — starting this fall, she'll appear as a special contributor on CBS' 60 Minutes.

"There is only one Oprah Winfrey," the news magazine's executive producer Jeff Fager said, according to CBS News. "She is a remarkable and talented woman with a level of integrity that sets her apart and makes her a perfect fit for '60 Minutes.' "

The 26-year-old man accused of opening fire at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport earlier this month pleaded not guilty to 22 counts at his arraignment in a federal court on Monday.

Esteban Santiago Ruiz allegedly traveled from Alaska and started firing in the Florida airport's crowded baggage claim area. Investigators say he continued until he ran out of ammunition, then dropped his weapon and was arrested by law enforcement officers.

More than 1.3 million people have signed an official U.K. petition to prevent President Trump from making a state visit to the U.K. — and the number continues to grow.

"Donald Trump should be allowed to enter the UK in his capacity as head of US Government," the petition states, "but he should not be invited to make an official State Visit because it would cause embarrassment to Her Majesty the Queen."

President Trump has reorganized the National Security Council by elevating his chief strategist, Steve Bannon, and demoting the director of National Intelligence and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Bannon will join the NSC's principals committee, the top interagency group for discussing national security. The National Security Council is the staff inside the White House that coordinates decision-making by the president on such matters, in coordination with outside departments including the State Department and the Pentagon.

For the first time, a U.S. team walked away with top honors at the prestigious Bocuse d'Or chef competition, seen as the Olympics of cooking.

The U.S. team was led by chef Mathew Peters and commis, or assistant, Harrison Turone. Norway took silver, and Iceland took bronze.

The competition pits 24 chefs against each other and is billed as the "most demanding and prestigious reward in world gastronomy," started by legendary French chef Paul Bocuse. The U.S. has long been an underdog: It has only stood on the podium once before, when it took silver in 2015.

Updated at 5:25 p.m. ET

President Trump said on Twitter Thursday morning that "if Mexico is unwilling to pay for the badly needed wall, then it would be better to cancel the upcoming meeting" with Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto.

Shortly afterward, news broke that Peña Nieto had done just that. He also took to Twitter and said he would not attend Tuesday's planned visit to Washington, D.C., without giving a reason.

Germany's Cabinet says it is scrapping a controversial and little-used law that makes it a criminal offense to insult foreign heads of state, effective Jan. 1, 2018.

Justice Minister Heiko Mass said the law is "obsolete and unnecessary," Deutsche Welle reported. He said the concept "dates back to a long-gone era, it no longer belongs in our criminal law."

On Wednesday morning, activists from Greenpeace unfurled a massive yellow and orange banner with the word "Resist" on a tall crane behind the White House.

"We climbed up the crane this morning, and occupied it and locked and chained ourselves in," the environmental group's board chairman Karen Topakian, 62, told The Two-Way.

We reached her as she was chained and locked high up on the construction crane with six other activists.

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