© 2023 KZYX
redwood forest background
Mendocino County Public Broadcasting
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Due to CalFire work at our primary transmission site, we will be experiencing periodic outages lasting approx. 30 minutes on various days of the week. We apologize for the inconvenience.

U.S. Trains Dogs for Homeland Security Duty

A Customs handler trains a dog to detect a person concealed in a box mixed in with airline luggage.
Pam Fessler, NPR
/
A Customs handler trains a dog to detect a person concealed in a box mixed in with airline luggage.
The canines also learn to distinguish between people riding as regular passengers in a vehicle and those concealed from authorities.
Pam Fessler, NPR /
/
The canines also learn to distinguish between people riding as regular passengers in a vehicle and those concealed from authorities.

The government spends hundreds of millions of dollars a year on equipment to detect explosives, chemicals, illegal drugs and other things someone might try to sneak across the border or into a building.

But some people think a more low-tech method -- canine detection teams -- can be just as reliable.

Many of the government's detector dogs are trained at a sprawling facility in Front Royal, Va. Pam Fessler reports from the Customs and Border Protection center.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Pam Fessler is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk, where she covers poverty, philanthropy, and voting issues.